THE BRAVE PROJECT

The Brave Project is Changing the Narrative of Child Sexual Abuse Awareness in Black and Ethnic Minority Communities.

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What is The Brave Project?

The BRAVE Project was created by  Angela, during her time as a Director of Programs of an inner-city Community Center, she discovered there were 152 registered sex offenders living within a 1-mile radius of the Youth Center where she worked at the time.


The goal of the project is to empower children to use their voice to speak up without shame against anyone who tries to victimize or has victimized them, turning awareness into action.


A large body of research suggests that intervention at the neighborhood level is likely to prevent child maltreatment. The BRAVE Project collaborates with schools and community centers to bring sexual abuse awareness education to students in grades 3-5 and was the catalyst for the birth of her organization HER IMPACT

 

AWARENESS VIDEO RESOURCES

 
 

DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES

 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR BRAVE

A Brave Project Family Resource

A quick guide for parents and children to help prepare your family to be Brave in the fight against sexual abuse

FAMILY CODE OF CONDUCT

"A pre-determined set of values around bodies and boundaries can go a long way toward protecting your kids from sexual abuse" Download this free resource made available from Darkness 2 Light

CRISIS PLANNING FOR SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION

A "Darkness 2 Light" Resource

We often develop strategies [such as preventing isolation ]that help to prevent child sexual abuse under our existing circumstances. But what happens if those circumstances change?

 

Child Sexual Abuse is a widespread issue that can be found in every racial and ethnic group. 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys in America are victimized.  While BRAVE serves to bring awareness to all children, studies show a huge disparity amongst Black and African-American girls. 60% of Black girls experience sexual assault by the time they reach 18 years of age, and for every Black woman that reports her sexual assault, there are at least 15 Black women who do not report their experiences of abuse. In addition to that disparity in the Black Community, approximately 22 percent to 29 percent of all child sexual abuse victims are male and the reluctance of boys to report abuse suggests the number may be even higher.